CAREER

A Guide for Your First Year of Work in Canada

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Starting your first year of work can be both nerve-wracking and exciting. If you’re feeling like you aren’t confident about the first year or just need some tips on handling your first year, use this guide for your first year of work! In it are a bunch of things that you should do in order to have success, and some things you should never ever do.

What you MUST do

The following tips are guaranteed to make your first year that much better and easier!

Start before you start

Cheerful young brunet freelancer is smiling, typing on his laptop in nice modern work station at home, in casual smart wear

One tip that we highly recommend is “starting before you start.” This means doing some research on the company’s goals, strategies, and working environment in order to better prepare yourself. Doing this extra research beforehand will help you seem more prepared and competent when you start working at this new company. Your bosses will be really impressed by your knowledge of the company, considering it’s only your first day or week! This is an excellent tip to starting your job off on the right foot, and an important piece in our guide to your first year of work!

The same goes for work meetings. It’s a great idea to plan for upcoming work meetings!

Introduce yourself often

When just starting your brand new job, it’s important to introduce yourself repeatedly and to many people. This allows coworkers to learn your name, what you will be contributing to the company, and means they may seek you out later so you can work together! In addition, introducing yourself shows you’re confident and excited to work there! This is a great vibe to put out to new coworkers and might even help you to make new work friends!

Seek out a friend

Another tip that could really help you in your new workplace is making a friend! When you first come into a new workplace, things might feel isolating and also stressful because you’re trying to do everything perfectly. Making a new friend quickly might help you to feel more comfortable in your workplace, which is great! Try your best to make a new friend, and hopefully, you’ll settle in easier because of it and maybe engage in other cool work projects that you didn’t previously know about.

Set goals

Top view of notepad with Goals List, cup of coffee on wooden table, goals concept, retro toned

When you enter a new job, a great idea is to set small goals. Well, it seems like you have to do everything perfectly right away, that simply just won’t be realistic. Instead, set small goals so you can get better each day, week or month at your job. For example, maybe your new job requires you to use software that you’ve never seen before. A good goal for tackling that problem might be to create a list of all software functions as you learn them. That way you have less of a chance of making mistakes with the software or having to ask questions about how to use it. Another goal could be to learn one section of the software well after one week. This outlines a clear weekly intention that will benefit you very much!

What you should NEVER do

This next section demonstrates everything you should avoid when starting a new job! Be sure to avoid these behaviors at all costs.

Show up late

Never do this. Showing up late to a brand new job signifies to employers that you’re lazy, don’t care about the workplace and are unprofessional. If you want to stay in the good books at your new job, be sure to show up on time, if not earlier than when your shift actually starts.

Dress unprofessionally

Most workplaces have dress codes in place. This could consist of business casual clothing, or perhaps a uniform. Whatever the dress code is at your workplace, it’s important that you don’t violate it! Always stick to the dress code when you first get a new job. If later you want to discuss a more flexible dress code with your employer, this is also an option. Just be sure to do it once you have developed a good connection with your superiors.

To get an idea about dress codes in Canada, visit Monster to learn!

Take too many personal calls

Girl checking phone

Not only is taking too many personal calls distracting for others, it means you are on a call instead of completing your work. Instead, respond to personal calls outside of work time as much as you can. This will demonstrate your commitment to your work, which is what new employers want to see from their employees.

Be rude to your boss or co-workers

Going crazy and insane, stress and agression. Angry young brunet bearded entrepreneur is pointing at his partner, blaming him, they sit in a cafe, wearing formal wear

One of the biggest things to avoid is disrespecting others in your workplace, especially those who are more high ranking than you. Being generally rude to others is not only unpleasant for people but showcases your personality in an ugly light. Likely, this behavior won’t be tolerated for long and you could lose your job! So, instead, choose to always be kind and assertive. Even if you have a conflict with someone at work, the best thing to do is remain calm and assertive, and if you need to, report it to human resources.

The first year of work is critical. This is when employers notice you most and decide if they’re willing to keep you on or not. Although this is stressful if you simply prepare and try your best you should be okay! Be sure to follow our guide to your first year of work, and of course ask questions when you first start your job. Better to know what’s expected of you early on so you don’t head down the wrong track.

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