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seven common canadian superstitions & beliefs
Seven Common Canadian Superstitions & Beliefs 
seven common canadian superstitions & beliefs

Seven Common Canadian Superstitions & Beliefs 

Superstitions are beliefs and thoughts that many people consider irrational. Every country has superstitions, and Canada’s superstitions reflect its cultural influences. Some superstitions are universal such as the lucky four-leaf clover, whereas others are unique to Canadian folklore. In this article we will share six different superstitions and what they represent. 

1) Opening Umbrellas Inside 

In Canada, as well as many other parts of the world, opening an umbrella indoors is considered bad luck. Many Canadians, whether they believe in superstitions or not, still avoid opening umbrellas indoors. 

2) Making a Wish on a Wishbone 

The act of making a wish on a wishbone is a very common Canadian superstition. This superstition is often performed during Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner when families enjoy a large meal together that is composed of turkey. The superstition occurs after the meal, when the wishbone is set aside to dry. Once dried, two people each hold onto one end of the wishbone, close their eyes, and make a wish. Each person pulls on the wishbone until it breaks, with the person who has the larger part getting their wish granted. 

3) Friday the 13th 

The superstition surrounding Friday the 13th is believed to have originated from both religious and cultural history. In Christianity, Friday is considered an unlucky day because it is believed that Jesus was crucified on a Friday. The number 13 has been regarded as unlucky in Western culture for many years, often considered irregular compared to the “complete” number 12 (12 months in a year, 12 zodiac signs, etc.). By combining both of these elements, Friday the 13th is a symbol of bad luck for many. 

4) Black Cat 

One of the most widespread superstitions in Canada is the belief that seeing a black cat will bring bad luck. This superstition originated from European folklore, where black cats were associated with witches and dark magic, and witches could transform into these animals, bringing bad luck. Despite cats now being beloved pets, this superstition still lingers in many people’s memories. 

5) Four-Leaf Clover

In contrast to the ominous black cat, the four-leaf clover is recognized as a symbol of good luck, originating in Ireland. Finding a four-leaf clover is a rarity throughout the world, with each leaf representing faith, hope, love, and luck. 

6) Knocking on Wood

A common practice among Canadians is the act of knocking on wood to prevent jinxing something, or to prevent misfortune. This superstition likely originates from ancient pagan beliefs that spirits resided in trees, and knocking on wood would call for their protection. Whether it’s a casual tap on a wooden surface or a deliberate knock, this superstition remains a go-to for many Canadians looking to prevent bad luck.

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